Double Tech is a set of mostly instrumentals—although much like the city late at night, you may occasionally hear a furtive human voice—that put new high-tech life into the sound of low-budget VHS sci-fi horror films of the 80s a la Cronenberg, Carpenter and crew. You remember that midnight basic cable aesthetic for sure: agitated, pixelated, alienated and mutated." /> L.A. Record

GIOVANNI MARKS: DOUBLE TECH JEEP MUSIC

September 12th, 2015 | Album reviews

GIOVANNI MARKS
Double Tech Jeep Music
HIT+ RUN

So this is “crev-wave,” the label tells me. When you’re already in the underground and you fall down an even deeper hidden hole, that might just be kind of the crevice we’re talking here. And whether or not that’s why Giovanni Marks—a.k.a. Subtitle, one of the first people on an L.A. RECORD cover—picked the name, the concept fits. Double Tech is a set of mostly instrumentals—although much like the city late at night, you may occasionally hear a furtive human voice—that put new high-tech life into the sound of low-budget VHS sci-fi horror films of the 80s a la Cronenberg, Carpenter and crew. You remember that midnight basic cable aesthetic for sure: agitated, pixelated, alienated and mutated. “Put Name Here” (with bass from Coto) describes the vibe in two minutes: a distant, industrial lo-fi pulse and a clear and penetrating digital beat. That’s a lot of weight at opposite extremes, and you can hear the metal inside every song bend, like when big trucks drive over little bridges. First few tracks set the scene—like the Blade Runner opening credits, but from the perspective of the man in the city canyon, not the eye flying through the fires in the sky—and it gets heavy and alien by the second half on tracks like “Youth Is An Arc 78, 88, 98, 08” and UFO-landing-and-abduction sequence “Zartan Is Crev.” It’s an album that sounds very now and very familiar at the same time—a future arriving in pieces that you need to put together yourself.

—Chris Ziegler