POMAR give birth to a beautifully faithful krautrock album with synths and sounds done just right—even that motorik snare sound, which is where the rubber hits the road with this kind of thing—and endlessly satisfying re-translations of the golden age of Can, Neu!, Faust and the offshoots/one-shots/solo projects that took a genre and turned it into an ecosytem." /> L.A. Record

POMAR: THE CHUNG KING

September 6th, 2015 | Album reviews

POMAR
The Chung King
self-released

Chinatown band POMAR give birth to a beautifully faithful krautrock album with synths and sounds done just right—even that motorik snare sound, which is where the rubber hits the road with this kind of thing—and endlessly satisfying re-translations of the golden age of Can, Neu!, Faust and the offshoots/one-shots/solo projects that took a genre and turned it into an ecosytem. (If any locals remember Long Beach’s Magic Lantern and their maximally menacing song “At The Mountains Of Madness,” those locals need to immediately check out POMAR.) Truly, The Chung King supplies something for everybody who ever suffered what a wise man once called “German Import Disease”: the end of “Ricksha” is the foundling descendent of Neu!’s “Negativland,” “In Need” is a breathlessly atmospheric fly-by of La Dusseldorf’s Viva and “Too Early” is glowing with the gentle guitar influence of Michael Rother. (Actually, there are points here and on the heavenly anesthetic closer “The Room” where POMAR get so dissipated they actually start to drift into toward Spacemen 3’s Recurring.) Further notable moments: “Ricksha” and “Top Down” and the happily distorted “Sour Pout,” each doing some aspect of “Yoo Doo Right” right. Someone should put this on vinyl—it deserves it. Germany, you out there?

—Chris Ziegler