Search Results for "keenan marshall keller"

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TRACK PREMIERE: ZIG ZAGS “HUMANS MARCH (LET’S DIE)”

L.A.'s much-loved Zig Zags (including L.A. RECORD contributor Jed Maheu, who has a Royal Trux interview in our most recent issue) put out their latest They'll Never Take Us Alive back in May, and now they're just about to re-release their earliest music, too. 10-12-18 is a 2XLP collection of demos, rarities and oddities, ripped from the crypt in which they've lain for too many years, and L.A. RECORD is humbled to premiere stygian album closer "Humans March (Let's Die)." Longtime readers may remember this in its original form as part of a split soundtrack 7" for the debut issue of The Humans comic book by Keenan Marshall Keller and Tom Neely. By

Interview

FREAK SCENE: UNFILTERED COMIX RAGE

Keenan Marshall Keller is returning to the curatorial stage with ‘Freak Scene,’ opening July 6 at Synchronicity, mixing unknowns with more established artists like Johnny Ryan, Tom Neely, Josh Bayer and Benjamin Marra. We pore over some of the comics from the various artists, finding page after page of obsessive linework and delightful grotesquery. This interview by Walt! Gorecki. By

Radio

MIXTAPE: WE OOZE

L.A. RECORD contributor Keenan Marshall Keller has assembled this brain-straining mixtape of local and touring bands that will mostly be performing at the perfectly named WE OOZE festival tomorrow and Saturday at Show Cave's new location. Many of these bands have left particularly impressive snail trails across the pages of L.A. RECORD and all of them are American treasures. By

News

L.A. RECORD 100 THEME STREAM ON DUBLAB

Our friends over at dublab created a theme stream for us with tons and tons of past L.A. RECORD mixes to celebrate our 100th issue! LISTEN >>> LA RECORD “100″ THEME STREAM Theme stream includes: LA RECORD RESIDENT MIXES: 4TH OF JULY MIXTAPE by DAIANA… By

Interview

BIG FREEDIA: MAKE YOUR BOOTY GO

New Orleans’s premier ‘Sissy Bounce’ rapper Big Freedia will be in L.A. tonight performing a style of dance and rap music rarely seen outside of the Deep South. Even the dance-squeamish people will shake it. This interview by John Henry. By