Album reviews

Album reviews

LINE & CIRCLE: VICIOUS FOLLY EP

December 4th, 2017

On closing track "Mid Bloom," however, Line & Circle again flashes their sky-high potential, packing the verses with restless bass lines, sparkling guitars and a memorable melody, then launching straight into jangle-pop-rock heaven on the chorus. It's a glorious moment that recalls the splendor of "Roman Ruins" and ends Vicious Folly on a strong note.

Album reviews

PRETTIEST EYES: POOLS

November 27th, 2017

The trio's newest Pools, released on John Dwyer's Castle Face, happily captures the pulverizing energy and interstellar explosiveness at the very core of Prettiest Eyes.

Album reviews

DIMBER: DAMBER EP

November 21st, 2017

Though their songs deal with frustration, anger, and disappointment with the world and the current state of society, none of them sound dejected or hopeless. In fact, these songs come across as lifelines, or hands outstretched to those suffering most in these times. They offer solidarity, support, or—at the very least—acknowledgement that we all deserve the opportunity to be our true selves without fear of persecution.

Album reviews

OCS: MEMORY OF A CUT OFF HEAD

November 19th, 2017

Memory recalls a more hopeful era of folk rock, reminiscent of both the San Francisco and Laurel Canyon scenes in the 1960's, almost rising from the ashes that left by the scorching sounds of thee Oh Sees. Warm and comforting (and sometimes carefully discordant) melodies replace Dwyer's signature distortion, and harmony momentarily supersedes our disarray. Is there light at the end of the tunnel? For the next forty-five minutes, perhaps.

Album reviews

BATHS: ROMAPLASM

November 17th, 2017

Despite a newfound accessibility and aesthetic, Romaplasm’s deeply reflective nature proves something sugar-coated doesn’t have to suffer a loss in sincerity.

Album reviews

THE CIGARETTE BUMS: SIDEWALKIN’

November 15th, 2017

Every song sounds as if it was culled from a stack of psychedelic rock platters from the era’s 1966-69 heyday. Not clever pastiches in the manner of Neil Innes or note-perfect tributes like a half a dozen notable LPs of the Paisley Underground movement, either—what the Bums wheel out is closer to the Actual THC-soaked Nastyass Thing, minimally retooled for a less optimistic era with stronger drugs.