Album reviews

Album reviews

CUTTY FLAM: SHAPES OF SOUND

May 22nd, 2017

It’s not easy to take vintage styles and make them fresh again, but Cutty Flam manages to do it. Given how far they’ve come in just five years, there should be little doubt that this band is just getting started.

Album reviews

TASHAKI MIYAKI: THE DREAM

April 10th, 2017

Listening to these velvety songs feels like going on a trip to the coast on an overcast day, which is arguably the best time to go. If you are a fan of Young Prisms, Hope Sandoval, or the Jesus and Mary Chain’s more subdued material, you will fall in love with Tashaki Miyaki.

Album reviews

FOXYGEN: HANG

April 6th, 2017

Foxygen’s fifth LP, Hang, feels less like an album and more like a mini-musical. In just 32 minutes, the postmodern rock duo—singer Sam France and multi-instrumentalist Jonathan Rado—lead a 40-piece orchestra featuring the Flaming Lips’ Steven Drozd through E Street Band boogie, Bolan-esque power pop, ragtime schmaltz, and everything in between.

Album reviews

THE BUTTERTONES: GRAVEDIGGING

March 24th, 2017

Gravedigging picks up right where last year’s American Brunch left off: the intersection of surf, rockabilly, punk, and a little something extra that pushes their sound past “psychobilly”, “surfabilly”, or any other “billys” you might throw at it. This is nighttime music, the sonic equivalent of switchblades, speeding through Dead Man’s Curve and trashy ‘50s B-movies like So Young So Bad.

Album reviews

THE KNITTS: RETREAT

March 3rd, 2017

From the power-pop guitar and infectious, spelling bee verses of “Erotic Aquatic,” to the desert-y sidewinder feel of “Simple Folk,” there’s a punk energy and alternative heart that hold the album together, creating a cohesive and individual work that can only fit comfortably under one label: The Knitts.

Album reviews

ENTRANCE: BOOK OF CHANGES

February 24th, 2017

“I’d Be A Fool” and “Molly” are ancestral totems carved equally from Love’s Forever Changes and Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks. The melody of “Always The Right Time” tips its bolero brim to another classic damaged L.A. album, Beck’s Sea Change. Steered by Guy’s lilting vibrato, “The Avenue” delivers a modern verse to the narrator in Dylan’s “Like A Rolling Stone”: to be young, dumb, broke, and sad in the city, wanting to be loved and desperate to love.