Giant Waste of Man (including Ben Heywood of Chain Letter Collective and Summer Darling and Cam Dmytryk of Fakers and Facial) appeared out nowhere last June with their "All My Friends Are Batshit Crazy" single and now they're about to release their debut full-length The Politics Of Lonely this Fri., May 3, on Chain Letter. Like "Crazy," there's a lot of the spirit of the 90s at work here, and like "Crazy," it uses that spirit for its own distinctive purposes." /> L.A. Record

ALBUM PREMIERE: GIANT WASTE OF MAN “THE POLITICS OF LONELY”

May 2nd, 2019 | News

If you are an L.A.-area musician who would like to submit unreleased songs or videos of any genre for premiere, email a stream or download link to fortherecord@larecord.com.

L.A.’s Giant Waste of Man (including Ben Heywood of Chain Letter Collective and Summer Darling and Cam Dmytryk of Fakers and Facial) appeared out nowhere last June with their “All My Friends Are Batshit Crazy” single and now they’re about to release their debut full-length The Politics Of Lonely this Fri., May 3, on Chain Letter. Like “Crazy,” there’s a lot of the spirit of the 90s at work here, and like “Crazy,” it uses that spirit for its own distinctive purposes. “What About Happiness” has that Nirvana/Pixies loud-quiet-loud dynamic but with an unexpected kind of grit and texture that makes it sound even more urgent, while the plaintive “Petty’s Dead” builds from a heart-on-sleeve solo electric statement into a Sonic Youth (or Smashing Pumpkins?) noise ballad. The tempo and grinding tank-tread dynamic of grunge are there on “Mailblues” and “My Hurricane,” but there are elements of Guided By Voices’ off-center pop sensibility and even Elliott Smith’s Heatmiser or the post-Heatmiser outfit No. 2. And there’s a strange sense of bleakness and fighting through despite the bleakness across the entire album—maybe because of the conditions under which Lonely was recorded, says Dmytryk:

“We were recording with producer Sean Foye last year when it felt like the whole of Los Angeles was on fire. We’d sit out on the patio between takes and see the sun completely blotted out by thick clouds of smoke. That disorienting, apocalyptic image really stuck with us, informing the record as gnostic meditation on the same burning question we all ask ourselves as we age: how did we end up here?”

Giant Waste of Man’s The Politics of Lonely is out this Fri. from Chain Letter Collective—look for it here!