Album reviews

Album reviews

THE KNITTS: RETREAT

March 3rd, 2017

From the power-pop guitar and infectious, spelling bee verses of “Erotic Aquatic,” to the desert-y sidewinder feel of “Simple Folk,” there’s a punk energy and alternative heart that hold the album together, creating a cohesive and individual work that can only fit comfortably under one label: The Knitts.

Album reviews

ENTRANCE: BOOK OF CHANGES

February 24th, 2017

“I’d Be A Fool” and “Molly” are ancestral totems carved equally from Love’s Forever Changes and Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks. The melody of “Always The Right Time” tips its bolero brim to another classic damaged L.A. album, Beck’s Sea Change. Steered by Guy’s lilting vibrato, “The Avenue” delivers a modern verse to the narrator in Dylan’s “Like A Rolling Stone”: to be young, dumb, broke, and sad in the city, wanting to be loved and desperate to love.

Album reviews

FROTH: OUTSIDE (BRIEFLY)

February 20th, 2017

This is another great album from the band and I look forward to seeing it live.

Album reviews

MIND MELD: SELF-TITLED

February 17th, 2017

I think it’s safe to say we are in a golden age of garage rock in Southern California, and Mind Meld carries on that tradition. Make no mistake: this self-titled album is a scorcher all the way through.

Album reviews

HANNI EL KHATIB: SAVAGE TIMES

February 13th, 2017

Over the course of 2016 Hanni El Khatib released a number of EPs under the name Savage Times. Every few months resulted in a different gift, each as unexpected as the last. Having had the opportunity to experience all of the volumes—as well as cover some as they were released—I can say they’re just as powerful now as they were originally separately.

Album reviews

SHANNON LAY: ALL THIS LIFE GOIN DOWN

February 11th, 2017

Perhaps the greatest accomplishment of these recordings is how intimate they feel. There is never a moment that passes where it doesn’t feel like Lay is in the room, performing these songs by herself. There is strength in presenting yourself with nothing to hide behind, and that is exactly what Shannon Lay does on All This Life Goin Down. Here she can speak simply, directly, and honestly, drawing listeners in just as closely as Jackson C. Frank or Judee Sill ever did.