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Album reviews

THE PHENOMENAUTS: ESCAPE VELOCITY

August 4th, 2014 · No Comments

Imagine an after-hours party with Marc Bolan, Devo, and Cheap Trick . . . and then the Groovie Ghoulies show up!

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THE EVANGENITALS: MOBY DICK; OR, THE ALBUM

July 20th, 2014 · No Comments

I haven’t heard harmonies ring this good since the Chapin Sisters were on the scene.

OPEN MIKE EAGLE: DARK COMEDY

July 17th, 2014 · No Comments

Mike gleefully references comic books, Seinfeld jokes, and even They Might Be Giants! And he doesn’t shy away from calling out people for their idiocy and greed.

CHRISTIAN LEE HUTSON: THE HURT AND THE NATURAL CHARM (DAYTROTTER SESSIONS)

July 9th, 2014 · No Comments

The guitar picking eventually reduces itself to just idle, almost inaudible strumming, before Hutson comes back strong with the kind of woe that sounds almost indistinguishable from tired frustration.

PSYCHIC WEATHER: SHINING IN THE RED

July 4th, 2014 · No Comments

Mothers of Gut, play a show with them.

THE ANTI-JOB: YOU’RE NOT REAL

July 4th, 2014 · No Comments

The tunes have changes, great hooks, all kinds of keys, all kinds of acoustic and fuzz pedal combinations, all kinds of rhythms, stoicism, loneliness, storytelling, and, yes, a pop sensibility.

THE MOLOCHS: FORGETTER BLUES

July 3rd, 2014 · No Comments

Forgetter Blues (now finally on vinyl) plays like an album’s worth of “I’m Straight” for 2014: “I go out with a girl / she buys me drinks / but I can’t buy her anything,” sings Lucas, who has plenty more to say about how tough it is when you just wanna do your own thing.

BLU & BOMBAY: GOOD TO BE HOME

July 1st, 2014 · No Comments

Blu is the West Coast’s prodigal son that went off the beaten path, but on his latest solo project, Good to Be Home, he’s found his way back.

AMON DÜÜL II: DÜÜLERIUM

July 1st, 2014 · No Comments

News: this 45-year-old Munich collective’s first new music in twenty years is unsurprisingly grizzled and atypically longwinded.

NICK WATERHOUSE: HOLLY

June 18th, 2014 · No Comments

If Waterhouse’s debut LP was an excitable teenager ready to party, Holly is more of a confident man who knows how to take his time with a woman—or in this case, a song.