Album reviews

Album reviews

LITRONIX: PUMP THE GAS

June 16th, 2017

Kevin Litrow’s subversive synth-pop project Litronix has been kicking around for years now, and his debut LP Pump the Gas is not only worth the wait, but a product of it. Written and recorded over the four years Litrow spent living above a gas station at the corner of Venice & Lincoln, its tales of West L.A. slackers, bums, and self-righteous hippies will be as familiar to Angelenos as our semiweekly stops at fuel stations.

Album reviews

GOSPELBEACH: ANOTHER SUMMER OF LOVE

June 14th, 2017

Your second record is better than your first. Some say they like this band better than the last. You’re older, you’re wiser, you’re tighter, you’re smarter.

Album reviews

CUTTY FLAM: SHAPES OF SOUND

May 22nd, 2017

It’s not easy to take vintage styles and make them fresh again, but Cutty Flam manages to do it. Given how far they’ve come in just five years, there should be little doubt that this band is just getting started.

Album reviews

TASHAKI MIYAKI: THE DREAM

April 10th, 2017

Listening to these velvety songs feels like going on a trip to the coast on an overcast day, which is arguably the best time to go. If you are a fan of Young Prisms, Hope Sandoval, or the Jesus and Mary Chain’s more subdued material, you will fall in love with Tashaki Miyaki.

Album reviews

FOXYGEN: HANG

April 6th, 2017

Foxygen’s fifth LP, Hang, feels less like an album and more like a mini-musical. In just 32 minutes, the postmodern rock duo—singer Sam France and multi-instrumentalist Jonathan Rado—lead a 40-piece orchestra featuring the Flaming Lips’ Steven Drozd through E Street Band boogie, Bolan-esque power pop, ragtime schmaltz, and everything in between.

Album reviews

THE BUTTERTONES: GRAVEDIGGING

March 24th, 2017

Gravedigging picks up right where last year’s American Brunch left off: the intersection of surf, rockabilly, punk, and a little something extra that pushes their sound past “psychobilly”, “surfabilly”, or any other “billys” you might throw at it. This is nighttime music, the sonic equivalent of switchblades, speeding through Dead Man’s Curve and trashy ‘50s B-movies like So Young So Bad.