Cage Tropical, an airtight batch of icy, synth-driven songs that radiate all the qualities that made Rose’s 2012 effort Interstellar so special." /> L.A. Record

FRANKIE ROSE: CAGE TROPICAL

August 9th, 2017 | Album reviews

FRANKIE ROSE
Cage Tropical
Slumberland

It has been four years since Frankie Rose released her third solo album, Herein Wild, and for her, that’s an eternity. This is, after all, a woman who spent most of the late 2000s and early 2010s cranking out record after record with indie-rock bands like Crystal Stilts, Vivian Girls and Dum Dum Girls. And even once she struck out on her own, she released three Frankie Rose albums in the span of three years. So why the gap? Turns out Rose moved from Brooklyn to Los Angeles and lost her way, ending up “short on sleep, funds and optimism,” she says. She has since moved back east, but she got something great out of the experience: Cage Tropical, an airtight batch of icy, synth-driven songs that radiate all the qualities that made Rose’s 2012 effort Interstellar so special. “Love In Rockets” is a lovely, moonlit pop tune bathed in echo. “Dyson Sphere” features a rubbery bass line and a lushly layered chorus. “Trouble” runs on the motorik beat, with Rose’s vocals shrouded in effects that lend texture, but don’t obscure her knack for addictive melody. “Dancing Down the Hall” blossoms from a wash of digital drones and tones into a gentle mystic ballad. Later, spindly guitars and pastel keyboards shimmer and soar through “Game To Play” and “Red Museum,” and so on and so on. With production help from expert atmospheric alchemists Jorge Elbrecht and Dave Harrington, Rose has created a pretty little soundworld of pillow-soft New Wave on Cage Tropical. It’s well worth the wait.

—Ben Salmon

FRANKIE ROSE’S CAGE TROPICAL IS OUT FRI., AUG. 11, ON SLUMBERLAND.