L.A. RECORD!

PULP: A FILM ABOUT LIFE, DEATH + SUPERMARKETS

Pulp began in post-industrial Sheffield—Jarvis Cocker’s steel city of cooling towers, deserted factories, “pudgy 15-year-olds addicted to coffee whitener, courting couples naked on Northern Upholstery, and pensioners gathering dust like bowls of plastic tulips.” Filmmaker Florian Habicht speaks now about knife-making, nut allergies, and Jarvis Cocker’s favorite bus stop. This interview by Rin Kelly.

Live reviews

JOHN COOPER CLARKE @ LA CITA

The peripatetic punk poet from Salford arrives late—20 minutes or 40 years late, depending in how you look at it—apologizing out of a halo of cigarette smoke, saying, “I got here a little late, too late to read the guest list.” It’s a failing he turns to his advantage as he then reads that guest list, making a poem out of it in which the names rhyme and people are caught unawares by his awareness and the utterly-packed house (courtesy of Part Time Punks) erupts into the rapture of applause. “I tried to make it entertaining as I can,” he shrugs.


MURDER BALLADS AND DARK SONGS @ ECHOPLEX

The 5th annual Murder Ballads & Dark Songs night at the Echoplex was as righteous and delightful as anticipated. Each performer brought a new spin to timeless songs about killers and bleeding broken hearts. …And there’s something about the audience sitting in chairs that makes it all feel more special and a little bit fancy.


KERA AND THE LESBIANS ARE BRINGING DUENDE BACK

“I’m so happy,” blurted an elated Marketing Director of the Fold, midway through Kera’s performance. Even if she didn’t mean it … the room compelled her to HAVE TO SAY IT.


BOY AND BEAR @ THE FONDA

With reverence for such staples of Americana (yes I know Young is from Canada), Boy & Bear has a lot to live up to but the band certainly met the mark, especially in categories of self-exploration, lyrical depth, and haunting harmonies.


AUSTIN PSYCH FEST @ CARSON CREEK RANCH

Yes, you heard that right: the Flamin’ Groovies have bested the Zombies.


Album reviews

LACE CURTAINS: A SIGNED PIECE OF PAPER

Coomers (of Harlem, probably one of the more underrated bands on Matador) returns with his second solo-ish album as Lace Curtains, set in a semi-imagined L.A. somewhere between Billy Wilder’s Sunset Boulevard and Warren Zevon’s Gower Avenue and soundtracked by what sounds like Gary Wilson’s Blind Dates and a pack of wolves. (Listen to ‘em howl on “Kali.”)


THEE COMMONS: ROCK IS DEAD: LONG LIVE PAPER AND SCISSORS

Rock is Dead: Long Live Paper and Scissors is a comprehensive anthology containing 20 tracks hand-picked from Thee Commons’ nine EP discography. For the first time in their relatively short (but extremely prolific) tenure as a band, they’ve released a compilation that brings together the best of the best from all of their mini-volumes into one CD, chronicling their growth as musicians and tracking the various influences that have shaped their unique style along the way. Here, they bring together a very diverse array of elements including 60’s-era garage riffs, strong surf-guitar melodies, cumbia rhythms and vocals heavy with retro-Latino flair.


TÜLIPS: “HOTSPUR” B/W “WAIT” CASSINGLE

It spurs fantasies in me of what Belinda Carlisle might have gotten up to if she’d never dropped the moniker “Dottie Danger” and had saved Sid Vicious’ life by getting him to play bass with her in Superchunk.


THE PHENOMENAUTS: ESCAPE VELOCITY

Imagine an after-hours party with Marc Bolan, Devo, and Cheap Trick . . . and then the Groovie Ghoulies show up!


THE EVANGENITALS: MOBY DICK; OR, THE ALBUM

I haven’t heard harmonies ring this good since the Chapin Sisters were on the scene.