L.A. RECORD!

FROTH: THE CUTEST WAY

Froth was a fake band first and that taught them how to be a real band. Their Patterns LP (on Lolipop / Burger) pulls from every classic album that sounds better in the dark—Seeds, Elevators, the gnarly early Spacemen 3—and they meet on Bonnie Brae to talk vacuums, Velvets and BBQDIY. They play this Saturday at Desert Daze. This interview by Chris Ziegler.

Live reviews

PHILIP GLASS’ THE CIVIL WARS @ WALT DISNEY CONCERT HALL

The LA Philharmonic’s stripped-down interpretation of Glass’ faithful treatment of Wilson’s words felt a little bit smart, a little bit chaotic, a little but underdone—in short, it was perhaps more faithful to Wilson’s raw gem than a huge-budget spectacle would have been.


THE WAR ON DRUGS @ THE TROUBADOUR

The nearly two-hour-long set was a study in tension and release, alternating between propulsive anthems and more brooding and introspective fare.


NEDELLE TORRISI @ OTHERWILD

“She has the voice of an angel” was whispered amongst the crowd more than a few times. Her nearly pitch-perfect, angelic voice was only trumped by her excellent projection while staying perfectly tight, landing on every note with the finesse of a butterfly and unleashing the power of a lioness upon belting select hard-to-hit notes.


JAPANTHER @ LYRIC THEATRE

Crackling movie quotes, punctuated artsy musings, stuttering programmed beats, and periodic commentary from their drummer garnished this tasty offering at WeHo’s Lyric Theatre.


STRUNZ & FARAH @ CATALINA’S

Acclaimed as much for their international virtuosity as for their dazzling eclectic live performances, Middle Eastern-flavored jazz/flamenco duo Costa Rican Jorge Strunz and Iranian Ardeshir Farah are credited for pioneering guitar-focused world music before the term even existed. The Grammy-nominated pair shares a prolific partnership spanning more than three decades, meeting in 1979 and learned of their shared ability to play mind-blowing instrumental guitar improvisations at lightning speed.


Album reviews

ST. VINCENT: ST. VINCENT

The main difference with St. Vincent is that Clark has found a way to make her protectionism the comment of her work instead of its white elephant.


BART DAVENPORT: PHYSICAL WORLD

With a smooth, likeable baritone Davenport kicks out ten crafted and polished pop gems that are as slick and shiny as a dolphin’s ass.


FROTH: PATTERNS

Shimmering Omnichord, subtle 12-string jangle, not-so-subtle fuzz guitar: wielding these, the band propels the songs forward with unfettered exuberance. If to-the-point garage psych is what you’re after, buy a ticket for Froth’s ride.


GENERATION SUICIDA: CON LA MUERTE A TU LADO

Generation Suicida is actually too good to be limited to MP3 and FLAC. Take note, labels: Give these guys the wax platter they deserve.


THE ENTRANCE BAND: FACE THE SUN

The Entrance Band have taken the contemplative approach, delivering a (relatively) quiet album of bluesy, introspective tunes with names like “Temptation” and “Medicine” and “the Crave” that leave very little to misunderstand.